Aloe Vera Juice, Gel, & Extracts Benefits for Skin, Hair, & Nails

One of the oldest known natural remedies. The first authentic record of Aloe as a plant with healing properties is accredited to a Mesopotamian clay tablet dated at ca 2100 bce. The first detailed depiction of the plant’s medicinal value is found in the Papyrus Ebers, an Egyptian document dated at ca 1550 bce, which sets out multiple Aloe-containing preparations for the treatment of external and internal ailments.

 

Aids nutrient absorption, helps body aches, aids digestion and immunity, stomach acid neutralizer, soothes burns, itching and irritation; anti-bacterial, antioxidants, reduces dental plaque, helps lower blood sugar, hair moisture.

 

  • Natural preservative

  • FDA approved since 1959 as over the counter burn treatment -it prevents UV-induced suppression so the area can heal at a faster rate.

  • It provides 20 of the 22 human-required amino acids and eight of the eight essential amino acids.

  • Aloe vera contains many vitamins and minerals vital for proper growth and function of all the body’s systems.

  • Aloe vera contains antioxidant vitamins A, C and E — plus vitamin B12, folic acid and choline.

  • It contains eight enzymes, including aliiase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, bradykinase, carboxypeptidase, catalase, cellulase, lipase and peroxidase.

  • Minerals such as calcium, copper, selenium, chromium, manganese, magnesium, potassium, sodium and zinc are present in aloe vera.

  • It provides 12 anthraquinones — or compounds known as laxatives. Among these are aloin and emodin, which act as analgesics, antibacterials and antivirals.

  • Four fatty acids are present, including cholesterol, campesterol, beta-sisosterol and lupeol — all providing anti-inflammatory results.

  • The hormones called auxins and gibberellins are present; they help with healing wounds and have anti-inflammatory properties.

  • Aloe vera provides sugars, such as monosaccharides One of the oldest known natural remedies. The first authentic record of Aloe as a plant with healing properties is accredited to a Mesopotamian clay tablet dated at ca 2100 bce. The first detailed depiction of the plant’s medicinal value is found in the Papyrus Ebers, an Egyptian document dated at ca 1550 bce, which sets out multiple Aloe-containing preparations for the treatment of external and internal ailments.

    Aids nutrient absorption, helps body aches, aids digestion and immunity, stomach acid neutralizer, soothes burns, itching and irritation; anti-bacterial, antioxidants, reduces dental plaque, helps lower blood sugar, hair moisture.

    • Natural preservative

    • FDA approved since 1959 as over the counter burn treatment -it prevents UV-induced suppression so the area can heal at a faster rate.

    • It provides 20 of the 22 human-required amino acids and eight of the eight essential amino acids.

    • Aloe vera contains many vitamins and minerals vital for proper growth and function of all the body’s systems.

    • Aloe vera contains antioxidant vitamins A, C and E — plus vitamin B12, folic acid and choline.

    • It contains eight enzymes, including aliiase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, bradykinase, carboxypeptidase, catalase, cellulase, lipase and peroxidase.

    • Minerals such as calcium, copper, selenium, chromium, manganese, magnesium, potassium, sodium and zinc are present in aloe vera.

    • It provides 12 anthraquinones — or compounds known as laxatives. Among these are aloin and emodin, which act as analgesics, antibacterials and antivirals.

    • Four fatty acids are present, including cholesterol, campesterol, beta-sisosterol and lupeol — all providing anti-inflammatory results.

    • The hormones called auxins and gibberellins are present; they help with healing wounds and have anti-inflammatory properties.

    • Aloe vera provides sugars, such as monosaccharides (glucose and fructose) and polysaccharides.

     

Recommended usages: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/aloe/dosing/hrb-20058665

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92765/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218914

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763764/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92765/#ch3_r81

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3872617/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103709/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25478478

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92765/#ch3_r81